Blog

Meet our new Deputy Director!   07.25.17

SPACES is pleased to welcome our newest staff member, Sarah Murphy, who will begin her work as Deputy Director in mid-August.

As the SPACES Deputy Director, Sarah will be responsible for critical administrative, financial, and fundraising operations. She will secure resources for the organization and develop financial tools; guide budgeting; assist with program development as it overlaps with fundraising; and contribute to strategic planning. Originally from Cleveland, Sarah is a licensed attorney in the state of Ohio and moved to Chicago in 2015 to begin her work in the nonprofit development field-holding positions as a grant writer for Habitat for Humanity Chicago, and a development coordinator for Rape Victim Advocates. Sarah graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Law in 2013 and studied philanthropy and nonprofit organizations at Northwestern University School of Professional Studies while in Chicago.

She has a passion for mindful development work and we can't wait for you to meet her!


Author: Christina Vassallo, Executive Director
Category: General

Create it Forward: Realizing the Potential in Our Incarcerated Youth   06.29.17

You don't realize how many art supplies and tools contain some kind of metal until you have to make artwork without it. This is just one of the many challenges arts organizations and art instructors faced when engaging in a fledgling program created to enrich the lives of young men spending time at the Cuyahoga County Juvenile Detention Center. Create it Forward: Realizing the Potential in Our Incarcerated Youth is a collaborative program spearheaded by SPACES and CMSD teacher Melissa Marini Svigelj-Smith to provide desperately needed creative outlets for the youth caught up in the juvenile detention system. Through a generous grant from the NoVo Foundation SPACES worked with 10 artists and 4 arts organizations during the 2016-2017 school year to provide 15 on-site art workshops that would engage 13 students each class by showing them that creativity can be part of their livelihood.

Teacher Melissa Marini Svigelj-Smith instructs her class through SEL, or Social and Emotional Learning, as a way to provide her students with the tools to graduate and start their life anew. Her lesson plans are filled with daily reflections, exercises to reduce stress, uplifting and inspirational stories, and now, art making. It can sometimes be difficult to measure what impact SEL instruction can have with such a transient student body. In 2014 it was reported that there were 2,450 juveniles who spent time at CCJDC that year, though there is only a daily average of 136 juveniles. Which means some students are only in the system for a day, some a week, some longer. Regardless of their sentence length, Ms. Svigelj-Smith believes each student's time in the classroom and exposure to SEL is invaluable for their growth and hopefully will result in reduced recidivism rates.

Beginning in August of 2016 SPACES brought together Zygote Press, Inc., Art House, Inc., Twelve Literary and Performative Arts Incubator, cartoonist and journalist Josh Usmani, musician Luke Rinderknecht, Creative Fusion artist Michela Picchi, and culinary artist Bea Svigelj with the mission to assist Ms. Svigelj-Smith in her efforts to introduce art making into her SEL classroom. A major part of the SEL education model is imparting generosity and empathy. In this effort the students' work was donated, when possible, to local charities that focus on human services, such as Ronald McDonald House. Students decorated cupcakes; made cookies, paper, masks, beads, pencil holders, and silkscreen prints; learned about mural making; created character designs and cartoons; learned body percussion; made Christmas Cards for ill children at the Cleveland Clinic; and participated in creative writing. There was also a special screening of the documentary "Cooler Bandits" with a visit from Donovan Harris, one of the subjects of the film.

When the students of Ms. Svigelj-Smith's class reviewed their art making experiences, it was clear that a lasting impression had been made. Some students had favorites, while others just enjoyed the exposure to new things, as can be seen below from the students' mid-year classroom reflections:

"I never knew how paper was made, and I always wanted to."

"I liked the silk screen painting the best, because it showed me something new."

"I liked making Christmas Cards the best, because kids don't always get gifts for Christmas and they're sick so I know they were happy to get the cards we did."

"My favorite was cartooning and sculpting, because it gave me the idea to start writing my first book."

"I liked the cartooning because I like drawing and making cartoons."

"They were cool and fun. For most I took my time and others I went fast because it was easy to do. And I got help if I was stuck."

"What I like about the activities that I participated in was learning new things and learning how to create new things."

In April 2017, after nine art making workshops, Ms. Svigelj-Smith's students participated in CommunitySPACES. Their artwork was on display with the artwork of constituents from 7 other organizations and was shared with over 200 hundred visitors during the exhibition. It was a moment of pride and validation for the students' creative work.

Create it Forward: Realizing the Potential in Our Incarcerated Youth is just one facet of SPACES' Community Engagement Campaign, which aims to increase the community's exposure to experimental artists and artwork through collaboration. There are a lot of talented young men and women in the Cuyahoga County Juvenile Detention Center, and SPACES is happy to share their creative potential with you.

Create it Forward: Realizing the Potential of our Incarcerated Youth

If you were inspired by Create it Forward: Realizing the Potential in Our Incarcerated Youth and would like to donate art supplies, share your artistic talent, or make a monetary donation to keep programs like this and others going, please email Executive Director Christina Vassallo at cvassallo@SPACESgallery.org

Teacher Melissa Marini Svigelj-Smith taking placemats created from student prints to Ronald McDonald House.
Teacher Melissa Marini Svigelj-Smith taking placemats created from student prints to Ronald McDonald House.

Keywords: art making, at risk youth, incarcerated youth, prison art, youth art programs
Author: Michelle Epps, Community Engagement Manager
Category: General

Kid Art Review #9   06.16.17

For this edition of "Kid Art Review" our guest reviewer is 10 year old Jack, who loves video games, music, drawing, and Cryptozoology. Jack reviewed our current artist projects one afternoon.

(SPACES) What is your favorite piece in the show and why is it your favorite?



(Jack) "The hair" because it's pastry and probably tastes good.



(SP) If you could eat this piece what would it taste like? Would it be spicy, tart, sweet, salty, bland, etc.?



(Ja) Well it's a pastry, so sweet, but it probably tastes moldy but that's not an option.



(SP) If this piece was a person you didn't know would you want to say "hi" to them or get to know them? Would they be friendly or shy?

(Ja) Shy, because that's what I would be, but also maybe they would be shy because I would eat them. Pastries will probably never turn into humans so I guess we will never know.



(SP) Does this piece remind you of anything you have seen before?

(Ja) A certain wig. It's in the White House, that's all I'll say.



Questions about the Exhibition in General

(SP) If you could sum the show up in one word what would that word be?

(Ja) Cool. Because it was fun and cool. I liked the snow, that's what they use in tv shows. I thought they used fake snow that you can buy in bags, the shredded foam with the glitter in it, I think it's foam at least.



(SP) Does this show make you want to do anything? Go ride a bike, take a nap, throw rocks, have a sandwich, draw, watch tv, play, etc.

(Ja) It makes me want to eat. Because there is a pastry. I also didn't have breakfast today because we were in a rush.



(SP) If there was one thing you would say to the artist what would that be?

(Ja) Just hi.



(SP) If there was one question you could ask the artist what would that be?

(Ja) How are you? Because that's a question and it goes with my statement.



(SP) Out of 5 Truman's how many Truman's would you give this show?



(Ja) Well at first I didn't want to go because my mom just signs me up for stuff, but I gave it a three and a half because three and a half, I don't know that's just my answer. Three and a half.



We are currently searching for new Kid Art Reviewers for 2016! If you know a kid who would like to participate please complete this form.

Kid Art Review #9

Author: Michelle Epps, Community Engagement Manager
Category: Kid Art Review

SPACES Housewarming   01.18.17

A few days ago we opened our doors to the public, during Spaces to SPACES: A Roving Housewarming. With over 600 guests in attendance during Saturday night's party, some of the speeches got lost. Artist and SPACES grand opening planning committee member, Julia Christensen, gave a moving speech that illustrates the impact SPACES has had on artists since the beginning. Here it is:

SPACES began in 1978 when a group of artists came together to establish a space for experimental, interdisciplinary, collaborative, cutting edge art and performance, creating the space for that work to be exhibited in a gallery setting. It is said that there were 35 people at that first gathering.

And here we are, a gathering of people coming together to establish a NEW space for the exhibition of contemporary artwork, in the name of SPACES. At that first gathering there were 35 people in attendance, and tonight, we sold over 600 tickets. Which goes to show how absolutely integral SPACES is to this community. A not-for-profit gallery, an artist-centered gallery, an accessible space that supports a thriving arts community. A space that is by and for artists. SPACES is as crucial as it ever, 4 buildings later, 5 directors later. I've been lucky enough to work with a couple of these directors--Chris Lynn, who is here with us tonight, and how can we not also raise another glass to the gifted leadership of Christina Vassallo, the woman who brought us through these doors tonight.

When SPACES began in the late 70's, those pioneering artists were interested in making room for new interdisciplinary forms and mediums that were not yet supported by traditional institutions. This continues to evolve in the art world, and it is crucial to have spaces that weigh the practices and processes of artists above the market, and above fashion. I look out at the audience here tonight, and I see so many friends, artists that are working to push the envelope of what the art world can handle. We make work that transcends discipline, we make work about contemporary questions and current events. And given our current current events, artists––and the public––need spaces like SPACES more than ever. SPACES makes the tools, the platform, and the megaphone accessible, so that this work is seen and heard here in Cleveland; meanwhile SPACES does real work that connects Cleveland with national and international arts dialogs. With the opening of this new building, that presence will be amplified, which is great for Cleveland, and great for SPACES---and what is good for SPACES, is good for artists.

I read recently that SPACES has had the same phone number since it prepared that first exhibition in 1978. In a digital age when nobody even knows anybody's phone numbers anymore, when galleries come and go and are constantly bought and sold, there is some kind of real truth in that. Truth about loyalty, truth about dedication, and truth about community. And I think you will all agree with me when I say-these days we need all the truth we can get!

Thank you SPACES for your dedication to us, to the artists! We are working to blaze new directions with you. And we, the artists, in turn are here to support you. A building is made of bricks, but A SPACE is made of THIS! Thanks!!

Image courtesy Kristian Campana
Image courtesy Kristian Campana

Author: Christina Vassallo, Executive Director
Category: History

SPACES' Newest Board Member   10.18.16

The SPACES Board of Directors appointed Hilary Spittle at its October 10th meeting, with a unanimous vote. "Hilary's background in marketing and communications is essential to the impact of SPACES, especially now, as we relocate to our new home at the Van Rooy Coffee Building and open to the public in January 2017," said Christina Vassallo, SPACES Executive Director.

Hillary Spittle is a communications executive with extensive global and domestic experience in key communication disciplines, including brand and marketing communications, targeted events, and internal communications. She is currently a Divisional Marketing Communications Leader at Eaton Corporation, where she has also led brand transitions, developed global positioning, and served as a spokesperson on sustainability issues. Previously, Spittle worked for GM in its Detroit and Ruesselsheim offices.

"SPACES Gallery is a unique part of Cleveland's vibrant arts community, and I'm excited to join the team at this pivotal time," she said. Spittle joins a 25 member board of directors, half of whom are artists or creative professionals, as required by the organization's by-laws.

Author: Christina Vassallo, Executive Director
Category: General

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