Blog

eFELT subscription 05 | Lenka Clayton   03.10.15

FELT BOOK - eFelt newsletter #5
This week features Lenka Clayton.

Cure for Loneliness

Here, on one handy page (please print out) are the names of most of the people that you will come across in the next while. If you already know some of them then cut their names from the printed page, fold the little paper pieces up small and carry them around in your pocket. As you go about your days, think of them in there.

When you meet the other named people (at the bank, buying yogurt) tear them out too, fold them up and add them to your pocket. Be careful to remove all names from all pockets before washing clothes.

equipment required: printer, paper, sharp knife, pocket

Lenka Clayton


The FELT BOOK is a new collaborative publication by the Institute for New Feeling (IfNf) . A selection of artists contributions from the full publication are on view at SPACES , January 30-March 27, 2015.

The book is a collection of home remedies created by 40+ invited artists. The works submitted are as simple as a single sentence, while others include images, video, and web-based interactions. Each invited artist was asked to take on the IfNf mission statement: to explore "new ways of feeling, and ways of feeling new."

Visitors are invited to sign up for the free eFELT subscription service to receive a weekly remedy by email.

Sign up for eFELT .


For a current full list of FELT BOOK artists click here

The Institute for New Feeling, is
Scott Andrew, Agnes Bolt & Nina Sarnelle

Cure for Loneliness, by Lenka Clayton
Cure for Loneliness, by Lenka Clayton

Keywords: collaborations, efelt subscription , felt book, medical remedies, r&d
Author: Marilyn Ladd-Simmons, Gallery Manager
Category: Exhibitions

eFELT subscription 02 | Jennifer Nagle Myers   02.17.15

FELT BOOK

The FELT BOOK is a new collaborative publication by the Institute for New Feeling (IfNf) . A selection of artists contributions from the full publication are on view at SPACES , January 30-March 27, 2015.

The book is a collection of home remedies created by 40+ invited artists. The works submitted are as simple as a single sentence, while others include images, video, and web-based interactions. Each invited artist was asked to take on the IfNf mission statement: to explore "new ways of feeling, and ways of feeling new."

Visitors are invited to sign up for the free eFELT subscription service to receive a weekly remedy by email.

Sign up for eFELT .

This week features Jennifer Nagle Meyers.
For a current full list of FELT BOOK artists click here
The Institute for New Feeling, is
Scott Andrew, Agnes Bolt & Nina Sarnelle



Keywords: http://institutefornewfeeling.com/
Author: Marilyn Ladd-Simmons, Gallery Manager
Category: Exhibitions

Colin Lyons vs Midnight Dome   01.27.15

Congratulations to our SPACES alumni artist Colin Lyons on his upcoming July-August 2015 project in the Yukon.

Colin is working with he Natural & Manufactured thematic residency program at the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture to create an etching powered restoration machine.

Colin is traveling to the highest point in Dawson City, the Midnight Dome. At the top of Midnight Dome, he will construct a large tent and use metal detectors to find lost metal and tools. Colin will then create the etching powered restoration machine.

In his SPACES exhibition, Automatic Ruins, Colin explored industry through the lens of fragility and impermanence. While at SPACES he polished construction rubble and transferred onto the slabs floor plans from a building that will be restored this year in Ohio City.

Screen shot of Midnight dome in Dawson City, YT
Screen shot of Midnight dome in Dawson City, YT

Keywords: automatic ruins, chemical battery, colin lyons, etching, metal, r&d
Author: Marilyn Ladd-Simmons, Gallery Manager
Category: Exhibitions

Lyn Goeringer by Christopher Auerbach-Brown   05.14.14

In this second installment of interviews between The Vault guest curator, Christopher Auerbach-Brown, and the sound artists participating in Apopheny – Epiphany: What is Random?, Lyn Goeringer sheds some light on the power of sound, the robust Cleveland sound art community, and the inspiration behind her newest piece. If you'd like to hear what she's making for The Vault, come to the opening on May 30th, or have a listen at SPACES through July 22nd.

CAB: How did you first get started as a sound artist/experimental musician? What is it that attracts you to the wonderful world of sound?
LG: My start in sound art and experimental music comes from a few different places. The first was watching the Denver Symphony Orchestra play Penderecki's Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima when I was in elementary school.  I'd never heard musical instruments perform with extended techniques, so I was hooked. I wanted to hear those things, to write those things down for other people to play. When I finally got to college to start learning composition, I gravitated towards different boundaries and sound ideas, different modes of composition and such. I was also really invested in how sound works, and the physics and psychophysics of music and sound. My composition and art practice became not only about what sounds I made, but how we listened to them. For me, sound has power, real, tangible power that can transform space and time, and by doing so it can affect our human existence. Sound is pretty much the best thing ever. 

CAB: How does Cleveland's experimental music scene inspire your work?
LG: I'm somewhat new to Cleveland's experimental scene, as I moved here only a year and a half ago. What I can say is this: Cleveland's experimental music scene inspires my work by being so visible, so eager, so willing and ready to embrace new composers, new performers, new sound artists and really making it possible for people to get their music and sounds out there. Seriously! I have never seen or heard of such a vibrant community any where else. I'm so lucky to be here to take part in it. 

CAB: Give us a hint as to what your work for the Vault exhibition will be like, without divulging too many details. Think of this as an enticing peek at your piece and your working process.
LG: When asked to participate in this show, you gave a few brief guidelines that focused on using the resonant frequencies of the room, a list of those frequencies, and the basic concept of the show, which would focus on random connections that we make between images and sound. I was lead to a path of hidden things: a space I would not be able to explore hands on while working on the piece, accompanying video content that I would have no knowledge of before hand, and a collection of pitches that were provided to me that I would have to trust were accurate and gathered in a way I could understand. Indeed, making the piece would be engaging deeply with the concepts of apophany, of coincident and randomly occurring events that may or may not have a perceivable meaning when joined. Knowing these things, and trying to make connections of my own, I have chosen to work with algorithmic processes to generate the sound environment (music? maybe) that I'm working with. The piece focuses heavily on geomantic principles, where the timing structure is based on various esoteric writings by Aleistar Crowley. Though the 'numbers' within the system I have designed are pre-determined (the pitches used in the piece, possible duration and volumes of notes heard), the piece is largely dependent on randomizing structures within the computer environment it is designed around. 

CAB: How does the work you're making for The Vault connect with your future projects (or not)?
LG: Over the next few months I'll be working on a new album, and its basic structure will have an influence over The Vault piece.  I'll be performing in the area a bit this coming fall (dates and times TBA), and I also have a large installation that uses light bulbs to make sound. I'll be posting on my website and twitter feed with dates and locations as things are determined.  


Author: Christina Vassallo, Executive Director
Category: Exhibitions

David Russell Stempowski by Christopher Auerbach-Brown   05.05.14

SPACES asked Christopher Auerbach-Brown, our visiting The Vault curator, to pose a few questions to the sound artists participating in Apopheny – Epiphany: What is Random?, opening on May 30th. Here, David Russell Stempowski talks about how he got started making sound art, the larger context of the Cleveland music scene, and what he is contributing to The Vault.

CAB: How did you first get started as a sound artist/experimental musician? What is it that attracts you to the wonderful world of sound?
DRS: I grew up playing drums and percussion after my grandfather, Russell Ingrassia, gave me a snare drum at age ten. After about twelve years of playing rather traditionally I began to take an interest in creating experimental music. Throughout my life I've always been attracted to the textural moments in-between chords or at the end of songs, I found a lot of textural passages in industrial music and jazz. Sometime around 1999 a friend simultaneously turned me on to Ornette Coleman, "Free Jazz and Merzbow Pulse Demon." I don't think I ever listened to anything the same way afterwards. My early excursions into experimental music often involved four track tape manipulation of various percussive and dissonant sounds.

CAB: How does Cleveland's experimental music scene inspire your work?
DRS: It offers a lush mixture of noise, synthesizer and academic experimental music filled with outsiders searching for new techniques and sounds. Over the past decade the thoughtfulness and creativity I have witnessed has driven me to be a more innovative and productive artist. Cleveland is lucky to be situated between Chicago and New York as a stop for many touring musicians. Through the years I have had opportunities to see and share the stage with many extremely inspiring and challenging acts.

CAB: Give us a hint as to what your work for the Vault exhibition will be like, without divulging too many details. Think of this as an enticing peek at your piece and your working process.
DRS: For The Vault I've been recording long passages in opposing directions, frenetic short loops and pensive tonal sketches. I've been cutting those recordings into precise phrases and loops and weaving them together into a longer composition that changes focus every thirty to sixty seconds. This is my typical style when I record / perform under my Collapsed Arc moniker. For this work in particular I've been keeping in mind what you mentioned to me about frequencies and random juxtapositions. If time allows I may layer in some field recordings from SPACES.

CAB: How does the work you're making for The Vault connect with your future projects (or not)?
DRS: As an experimental musician I'm currently dividing my time between my solo work as Collapsed Arc and my experimental music / performance art duo with Josh Novak called Stopped Clock. My loop-based work with these two projects connects directly to the work I'm making for The Vault. I'm also perform in a gothic hard rock band called MURDERMAN where, in addition to singing, I engage in theatrics using lights, mirrors and other props. MURDEREDMAN is working on a new batch of songs while preparing to do some summer touring. Josh and I are busy recording and preparing performance routines, we play out in Cleveland fairly often. I'm also finishing up my first solo LP for release later this year. Beyond that I run a small record label, Polar Envy, and I do freelance graphic design in addition to my day job making prototypes at American Greetings.


Author: Christina Vassallo, Executive Director
Category: Exhibitions

SPACES x The Capitol Theater
View Calendar

23 SPACES x The Capitol Thea...

31 Professional Development ...

09 Re:Sound 3 & (p)SPACE