Blog

Stuff We Need, Stuff You Got   04.07.11

It never fails: for every exhibition at SPACES there is an artist who needs stuff—good stuff, new stuff, old stuff, borrowed stuff, tech stuff, free stuff, cheap stuff, expensive stuff, your stuff, our stuff.

So, to make things easy we've listed all the things artists have requested we locate. Can you help? Most likely yes.

How you can help:

  • If you locate items on the list send us an email at contact@spacesgallery.org, Attn: Stuff List
  • let us know what you have located, which artist it is for, how many there are, price, where it is, or if the item(s) be dropped off at SPACES.



So let's begin...
Rainbow Lightning (SPACELab, Akron, OH):
Here is a list of items they need for their SPACELab installation:
  • fake flowers
  • wax
  • fabrics
  • embroidery threads and backing
  • fiber fill and other stuffing
  • house paint
  • clothes, sheets
  • kids tents
  • bleach, rope
  • dyes
  • balls the size of basketballs or soccer
  • clear plastic bottles
  • clear beads
  • shiny objects or beads
  • mirror beads or gems
  • x-mas ornaments
  • fluorescent lighting and fixtures
  • small mirrors



Tamar Harpaz (SWAP artist from Israel):
  • slide projectors (all types)
  • reflecta slide projector 2500 AF-IR with 2.8/90mm
  • slide projector bulbs
  • glass slides



Amy Youngs (SWAP artist from Columbus, OH):
  • claw foot bathtub
  • shower curtain hoop
  • hydroponic herbs and lettuces

photo courtesy of Rainbow Lightning
photo courtesy of Rainbow Lightning

Keywords: amy youngs, chelsea blackerby, erica hoosic, r&d, rainbow lightning, spacelab, swap, tamar harpaz
Author:
Category: General

Machine Project   02.10.11

Tomorrow evening we open two projects: Elizabeth Dunfee and Machine Project. Elizabeth is an Akron-based artist who has expanded her painting practice to include video and sound in a room-sized environment. What is great and exciting about the SPACELab program is to watch local artists step outside of their comfort zones and try something different. SPACES provides a safe place for that experimentation to happen. Check out Elizabeth's interview on Cool Cleveland about her project:
http://www.coolcleveland.com/blog/2011/02/manic-growth-spaces-elizabeth-dunfee-explores-how-were-harming-ourselves/

Our other "exhibition" opening tomorrow is Machine Project. They are a unique and quirky confederation of artists based in Los Angeles. They provide art experiences that delve into experimental music, massage, psychic mediumship, food and poetry. What I love about Machine Project is how they consider people's full experiences at museums and galleries and not just the experience of looking at a thing. You'll likely find musicians squirreled away in odd corners of the gallery space performing for one or two people. You'll find fun and energetic displays of demolition at Destruction Karaoke (http://www.spacesgallery.org/events/destruction-karaoke-machine-project-event). The video below will give you an idea of how they try to make every interaction with their audiences an artful one.



Keywords: elizabeth dunfee, experimental music, installation art, machine project, painting, r&d, spacelab, swap
Author: Christopher Lynn, Executive Director
Category: Exhibitions

Manic Blog   02.10.11

As Elizabeth Dunfee delivers the strong message of self-depreciation through consumption, Manic Growth provides the much needed impetus to stop, reflect and explore how, as human beings, we can be more mindful and caring of our bodies and what we put in them,. Hopefully it gives us inspiration to transform our worlds (even if just 10%) on a micro and macro level.

Dunfee's exhibition will open to the public on February 11 (6pm) and is an exquisitely composed work of art that creates an environment of exploration and inquisition about life, art and the artist's statement.

After reading her interview on Cool Cleveland (http://www.coolcleveland.com/blog/2011/02/manic-growth-spaces-elizabeth-dunfee-explores-how-were-harming-ourselves/) I decided to look at works of art regarding the environment.

Although it is not directly related to the subject of her current exhibition, Dunfee's words about harming our body brought to mind how we also hurt our physical environments. What I found was a profound collection of photos from Yann Arthus Bertrand (http://www.yannarthusbertrand.org/v2/yab_us.htm) entitled Earth From Above, a portrait of Earth in the 21st century. What first began as a survey of the earth became a project about sustainable development; in the words of Bertrand, "man cannot be disassociated from the landscape."

What Dunfee and Bertrand do in their work as artists is instigate and agitate our consciousness. What do I really eat? What does it really do to me, to the environment? What is the state of the environment, inhabited by over 6 billion people in the world? What can I do to make myself and my world better?

It is this that the artists inspire in me from their works of art, and can inspire in so many others, which make art galleries and museums around the world priceless social institutions. On this note, I leave you with this quote from Mohandas Gandhi: "As human beings, our greatness lies not so much in being able to remake the world - that is the myth of the atomic age - as in being able to remake ourselves."

Keywords: elizabeth dunfee, environment, installation art, painting, spacelab
Author:
Category: General

I'd Make a Great Cop: Or How to Submit Applications for Exhibitions, Part 2   08.04.09

Part 1 (http://www.spacesgallery.org/blog/i039d-make-a-great-cop-or-how-to-submit-applications-for-exhibitions-part-1-08-03-2009) of this two-part series addressed SPACES' procedure for reviewing material as well as the more effective methods to use when applying to exhibit. This post tackles the more painful, less-effective methods. No one wants to realize that they did something incorrectly after the fact. Most every artist is excited about the prospect of exhibiting their work, but some treat that opportunity like Lennie Small from Of Mice and Men treats his puppy. Just relax. We can't understand your apparent genius when you're acting crazy and squeezing us to death. Just pay attention to the effective methods in Part 1 and steer clear of the following less-effective methods.

Less-Effective Practices


  • Introducing Yourself Through Facebook: Facebook is a very handy tool, but you'll come off as a tool if you drop me a note suggesting that I look at your website or post images of your work all over our profile's wall. See #1 under Effective Practices.
  • Casually Stopping By the Gallery With your Portfolio for a Meeting with the Staff or Director: Our days are often tightly scheduled. Even 24 hour notice isn't quite enough to accommodate a meeting. If you want a show, apply just like everyone else. If you want to meet us and talk art, most of us would be happy to do so. If you want to meet us and talk specifically about your art, it may happen, but don't expect much.
  • Submit a "Curated" Exhibition of "Me and My Friends:" We have a term for exhibitions that have been curated by an artist wherein he/she inserts him/herself into the exhibition. We call these "Me and My Friends" exhibitions*. Exhibitions like these lack legitimacy and honesty. It places the curator-artist at the center of the dialog with supporting characters who validate and verify the curator-artist's practice. It's a small step above the director of a non-profit art space scheduling a show for him/herself in the space they run. Something smells fishy. We hope that our curated shows give curators an opportunity to meddle in experimental curatorial practices (the artists shouldn't have all the fun).
  • Following Up With a Phone Call: Don't do this. If you are worried about your work arriving or arriving on time, mail delivery services have options that will let you know when a package arrives. It sometimes takes a while for us to organize a full-exhibition schedule and then respond to those we couldn't fit in. Don't call us (or email) unless more than four months have passed beyond the initial submission deadline and we have not responded to you.
  • Asking for an Extension: If you miss our annual deadline, let it go. Your career won't fall into ruins because you missed this opportunity. Just like our own beloved Cleveland Browns, there is always next year. Mark your calendars and set your cell phone to warn you regularly of the pending deadline so you don't miss it again.
  • Most likely you missed the deadline because you were ill-prepared, ill-informed or didn't schedule properly. But by trying to get an extension, you are in effect telling us that if we give you a show, you'll likely blow past any other deadlines we give you. Try again next year and impress us with your organizational prowess.


All in all, the application process is seen as a reflection of what it would be like to work with you on an exhibition. If you demonstrate that you are responsible, smart, reliable and skilled when it comes to submitting an application, then it stands to reason that the same characteristics would surface when assembling and installing an exhibition. If you blow past deadlines and cannot communicate or follow instructions, you will likely be a disaster to work with. Regardless of the merit of your work, exhibitions are social in nature. They involve working with the venue's staff and interacting with the public. We don't work with difficult people if we can help it.

If you disagree with these practices, I can completely respect that. We have been doing this for years and find this structure useful, but acknowledge that it isn't perfect. Also, the government sanctioned 501(c)3 status of non-profits has its own limitations that some might find, well... limiting. If you dislike our process and guidelines, my advice is to start your own art space. Heaven knows, we need more.

Posted by Christopher Lynn, SPACES Executive Director

* Other types of exhibitions include: "Crap in a Room," "Things That are White," and "Trying Very Hard to Look Very Bad."

Keywords: professional practices, r&d, spacelab
Author: Christopher Lynn, Executive Director
Category: General

I'd Make a Great Cop: Or How to Submit Applications for Exhibitions, Part 1   08.03.09

We receive a lot of exhibition inquiries and submissions to exhibit at SPACES. Many artists employ many different tactics to get an exhibition with us. Because this is the case, I have to be a stickler for rules to make sure that your time and our time are used effectively—I am the Application Police. Allow me to make our process more transparent in hopes that this can help you not only glide through the application process here, but elsewhere as well.

We select exhibitions from two main sources: 1) a panel reviews applications culled from an open call-for-entries; and 2) the panel also brings the names of cultural producers to the table who they think would be great SPACES artists. These materials are all considered equally and side-by-side to create a list that is ranked according to the panel's votes. This list is then contacted to find out if selected artists or curators are interested in exhibiting and when during the coming season they would like to execute their projects. The selection panel consists of 7-10 community staff members, artists, curators and/or other arts professionals and rotates annually.

To further demystify the process, I want to point out both effective and the less-effective practices when applying to exhibit at a non-profit art venue like SPACES. Part 1 of this post will address the effective methods.

Effective Practices


  • Check the Website First: Don't call, don't email the director, don't send us a message on Facebook, don't "just drop by" until you've checked the website for application details. At SPACES, we took the time to let you know how to best approach us. By taking the time to do your research, you are showing us that you are both responsible and able to operate a computer—two key traits in navigating the modern world. Read through the application guidelines thoroughly, including the FAQ before you approach us with any questions regarding the process.
  • Look At the Type of Work That We Show/Read the Mission: You can refer to our website, press or catalogs to get a sense of what we're about and the type of work we exhibit. Our mission statement also clarifies that we are looking for experimental and challenging work. There is nothing wrong with working in a more traditional vein, but if you work that way, you won't be shown at SPACES. We can't be all things to all people. We are dedicated to providing a venue for artists who are trying new things and questioning norms. Straight documentary photographs of native Amazonian tribes, although striking and well-crafted, will not win us over.
  • Follow Instructions: If you assume we receive around 200 applications in a year (most accumulating on the day of the deadline), and assuming that processing each application takes approximately 5-10 minutes (if the applicant has done their job properly), that means that our staff and volunteers spend at least 24 cumulative hours opening envelopes, sorting materials, copying images to a computer and other miscellaneous tasks just to get applications ordered for a panel review. When an application strays from our guidelines, we do our best to accommodate and correct, but each correction takes additional time. Doing an end-run around our easy-to-follow procedures does help us to remember your name, but not in a good way. As a matter of fact, you would make everyone else look even better and smarter—not a good move on your part.

    If we ask that all file names "should be lowercase with no spaces" we mean it. To streamline our process, each batch of images is uploaded to a server so our panel can review all applications online before convening. If files are not formatted as asked, they won't show up on the website for review, so we have to reformat them for you. If we're in a bad mood, your application gets tossed into a bin, never to have eyes laid on it. So, if we say that text documents should be in PDF format, don't send us Microsoft Word files. If we ask for JPGs, send us JPGs and not GIFs, TIFFs, JPEGs, or PSDs.If we ask for a CV, give us a CV, not a narrative life story.

    We ask for "10-15 digital images" "submitted in JPG format, 72 dpi, no larger than 1MB each." I can't tell you how many 3+ MB files we received in our last batch of applications. Since our panel is reviewing materials online, a file < 1MB takes 1-2 seconds to load. A 3+ MB image can take 10-20 seconds to load. You want the panel to be spending their time experiencing your work, not a loading screen.

    Don't send us a URL of your portfolio site or your Flickr page. We didn't ask for that.

    If we didn't ask for it, don't send it. Less is definitely more in this scenario.

    We don't ask that your applications be sent in a fancy folder or binder, because we then have to remove your materials from said folder or binder to place in our big, ugly manila folders to be filed with all the rest of the applicants. Your pretty binder will end up in the trash.
  • Test All Digital Materials Before Submitting: Don't just try to view your images/videos or listen to your MP3s on your computer, try out the material on a friend's computer as well or a few different types of DVD players (if applicable). Try the material on a Mac and a PC, if possible. We received a few applications where most of the images would not open on any of our computers. We asked the artists to send the images again. Rather than testing the images on their end before sending the second time, the artists would just send the same files to us once again. It isn't surprising that they didn't work that time either. Anyone who works in video realizes that often, video burned to DVD from a computer has the potential to not play on a myriad of other equipment. Test everything first.
  • Have Realistic Expectations: We have only four slots annually in our main exhibitions. We receive around 200 applications to fill those four slots. You can figure out the odds. If you do exhibit at SPACES, chances are you won't be "discovered" at SPACES. Your show will likely not sell-out on opening night. Our emphasis is not on selling work, that is the realm of commercial galleries. Although we do sell work occasionally, we are not constantly pushing your work to a steady base of collectors who we have been cultivating for years.

    We provide a safe space for experimentation, feedback and presentation of work to a varied public audience. We are more of a spring-board than a final resting place.


Read Part 2: Less-Effective Practices: http://www.spacesgallery.org/blog/i039d-make-a-great-cop-or-how-to-submit-applications-for-exhibitions-part-2-08-04-2009

Posted by Christopher Lynn, Executive Director

Keywords: professional practices, r&d, spacelab
Author: Christopher Lynn, Executive Director
Category: General

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